Even after just taking her name out of consideration for aposition on the NCUA Board, Carla Decker said she would absolutely go through it allagain.

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News Update:
March 28,2012, NCUA Bans Credit Union Board Member for DeckerDisclosure

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In an interview with Credit Union Times, Decker saidthat the overall process, from the day the White House firstapproached her about the nomination to the day when she took hername out of the running, had been about a year.

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She decided to withdraw the nomination, she said, because shehad received advice that given this was an election year with aparticularly partisan atmosphere, it was unlikely the nominationwould move to a hearing soon.

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“The controversial recess appointment of Richard Cordray to head the Consumer Financial ProtectionBureau also made the process difficult, I was told,” she added.

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Decker is the CEO of the 10,600 member, $46 million DistrictGovernment Employees Federal Credit Union in Washington, D.C., aposition she has continued to hold through the nominationprocess.

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During the process the credit union's performance had beencriticized, particularly after the CU's Dec. 10 exam report becamepublic. The report criticized the CU for not having foreclosureprocedures; inadequate reporting to the credit union's board oninformation security; and willingness by management to assume anunacceptable level of interest rate risk.

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The credit union's overall CAMEL rating was a 3. Its otherratings were: 1 for capital, 3 for asset quality, 3 for management,4 for earnings, and 2 for asset liability management.

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Decker said that one of the most challenging aspects of thenomination process was not being to speak up to provide somecontext in which to understand the credit union's performance.

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“As a presidential nominee, you are asked not to speak to themedia,” Decker said, and that it made it difficult when questionsabout her credit union's performance were raised.

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Decker still declined to comment on the December 2010 examreport, noting her credit union's policy of not speaking aboutconfidential documents, even those which had been madepublic.

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But she commented on her credit union's performance, noting thatduring that period the CU had already made strategic decisions tolaunch a couple of projects, in particular to build a new branchand to switch to a new data processing system, that it knew wouldbe expensive in the short run but it believed would serve membersin the longer run.

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“These were strategic decisions to build the infrastructure thatwould serve our members into the future,” Decker said. “We knewthey would be expensive, but that is why we had reserves.”

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