WASHINGTON-The number of credit card delinquencies is on the rise according to second quarter data from the American Bankers Association's (ABA's) latest Consumer Credit Delinquency Bulletin. During the second quarter of this year, 3.93% of credit card accounts were overdue, up from 2.99% in the first quarter of 2001 and 2.99% for the second quarter 2000. However, the total dollars outstanding for the second quarter credit card delinquencies were 4.13% (not seasonally adjusted), which was equal to the first quarter. These numbers are still higher than second quarter last year at 3.54%, according to ABA. The number of delinquent closed-end installment loans-which covers eight types of loans including auto, home equity, and other loans-rose to 2.51% of all accounts, up from 2.40% in the first quarter of 2001. This ratio last year totaled 2.30% in the second quarter of 2000. Direct auto loan delinquencies increased to 2.52% in the second quarter of 2001 from 2.26 in the first quarter. Delinquencies for indirect auto loans increased to 2.60% from 2.47% in the first quarter of 2001. The news is not all bad though. Delinquencies on home equity loans decreased from 1.32% to 1.18% in the second quarter based on the number of accounts. Late payments on home equity lines of credit also decreased, from 0.76% to 0.64%.

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